Project
A 'Close-up' Eye on Africa
- Savoring the 'Real' Africa
Tue. 2nd. Period Simon M. Bedelo
Keywords:
Discussion, Intensive Reading, Presentation, Project, Research, Speaking

Much of our Africa knowledge rests on the usual concept of poverty, suffering and danger. Many of the few who dare, however, to set foot in the continent return with a view that is unbelievably mesmerizing. The aim of this project course is to offer students the opportunity to savor the ‘real’ Africa and its true potential. The language components of the course are reading, short paragraph writing, presentation and discussion.

Students improve on these skills through carefully designed weekly projects done either individually or in pairs. At the end of each report session, students will write a half page reflection of what they have learnt from the various ideas.


Topics and weekly activities for this class are designed in a way that challenges students to think critically of what they often hear or see about Africa. At the end of the term, students will have the necessary foundation to talk Africa with ease and objectivity.


Participation in open discussions: 20%
Three summary reports (Week 3, 7 and 11): 15%
Three presentation reports : 45%
Final presentation : 20%


1

The Basic Elements of Communicative English

Students review the fundamentals of English communication. These include, among others, the basic structure of English sentences, the basic standard of reporting and the aspects of an opinion speech.

2

Mapping-up Africa

Students discuss the issue of 'Diversity' and how it defies much of the existing knowledge about the continent. 

3

Report Session 1

Based on the contents of Week 1 and 2, students give individual reports on aspects of diversity for some selected countries. The reports are followed by comments from the audience. 

4

Revisiting Colonialism

The session tackles the on-going issue of how to get pass the various impacts of colonialism in today's Africa. 

5

Report Session 2

Based on the contents of Week 1 and 4, students give short speeches on the issue of colonialism while connecting it with the situation in Asia. The speeches are followed by comments from the audience. 

6

AID: Myth & Reality 

The session discusses the eternal question of how best can foreign aid be provided. Students will listen to some of current thinkers who challenge the existing ways Africa has been receiving assistance from abroad. 

7

Report Session 3

Using the ideas introduced in Week 6, students present their individual views on how to render foreign aid more efficient. The presentations are followed by comments from the audience. 

8

The Leadership Issue

Students are introduced to the movers and shakers of Africa's socio-political life.

9

Report Session 4

Based on the content of Week 8, students give an introductory report of less known personalities who have changed lives in the continent. The reports are followed by comments from the audience.

10

The Japan-Africa Partnership

Students are introduced to the state of Japan-Africa partnership and the dynamics fueling it. 

11

Report Session 5

Using the ideas developed in Week 10, students share their individual views on various aspects of the partnership between Japan and Africa. The individual views are followed by comments from the audience.

12

The Art of Preparing a Final Presentation 

Students learn and review the main elements for preparing a power-point presentation.

13

Final Presentation (Group 1)

Using the various elements that were discussed so far, each student makes a power-point presentation outlining both their ‘newfound’ knowledge of Africa and their own personal ideas for a better use of Africa’s potential. The final presentations are followed by comments from the audience.

14

Final Presentation (Group 2)

Using the various elements that were discussed so far, each student makes a power-point presentation outlining both their ‘newfound’ knowledge of Africa and their own personal ideas for a better use of Africa’s potential. The final presentations are followed by comments from the audience.

15

Overall Review and Open Discussion

Students discuss what they have learned and how the class has impacted their view of today's Africa.


The class is rigorous, fun and rewarding. Students also have the opportunity to connect the issues discussed in the course to their individual academic interest; all this while working on their personal language needs.  

(S) is given to those who: 1) have attended all the classes; 2) have handed in assignments on time; 3) achieved 95 percent of overall points and 4) have been active in group discussions.